The Journal The Authority on Global Business in Japan

Advocacy | Viewpoints

November 2013
Expand Japan’s After-School Care (gakudo hoiku) System to Support Greater Workforce Participation by Women
Women in Business Committee

RECOMMENDATIONS

­The American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (ACCJ) applauds the stated policy objective of the Abe Administration of increasing the participation of women in the workplace. Both the aspirations of ensuring at least 30 percent of senior leadership positions in Japanese corporations are held by women and of improving preschool childcare facilities (hoiku-en) to enable parents of young children to remain in the workforce are important steps toward achieving this goal. However, the need for After-School Care continues once children enter the school system and is not currently being adequately met. To this end, the ACCJ recommends that the Government of Japan (GOJ):

  • Take additional steps to more rapidly expand coverage of public After-School Care (gakudo hoiku) from the current years 1–3 to include years 4–6 thereby enabling working mothers to accept management positions that they may otherwise have to turn down due to family considerations.
  • Expand the operating hours of After-School Care until at least 8:00 p.m. to provide parents with middle and senior management responsibilities the flexibility needed to pick up their children after they are able to leave the office.
  • Increase the number of publicly sponsored After-School Care providers (e.g. double by 2016; triple by 2020) possibly by involving individuals over the age of 60 who may not otherwise be employed but who are interested in part-time employment.
  • Offer a free-of-charge training course covering the information required to qualify individuals to provide After-School Care.
  • Provide subsidies for private organizations that promote or provide After-School Care and/or personal tax incentives for parents who use private After-School Care and After-School Care providers.

ISSUES
­
In order for women to progress in their careers as their families grow, care for elementary school-age children is as important as pre-school care. Although the Child Welfare Act Amendment of August 2012 has expanded the age of children eligible for public After-School Care (gakudo hoiku) up to year 6 (age 12) from April 2015, we encourage the GOJ to take additional steps to effect a more rapid and comprehensive increase in capacity.
There is no question that the capacity and scope of current public After-School Care is insufficient. There were 20,846 After-School Care facilities and 846,967 children who were attending these facilities as of May 2012. In the past 14 years, the number of After-School Care facilities has increased 210 percent, whereas the number of children attending these facilities has risen 250 percent. The current government-subsidized After-School Care is predominantly available to children from year 1 to year 3, with 50 percent of facilities not accepting children in year 4 and above. According to statistics from the National Gakudohoiku Association (Zenkoku Gakudohoiku Renraku Kyougikai), the number of children attending After-School Care drops off significantly between year 3 and year 4  and an estimated 500,000 children are currently on the waiting list for After-School Care.
There is little or no publicly sponsored support available for parents of children in year 4 to year 6, even though various experts, including the National Gakudohoiku Association and Professor Kazuo Yamaguchi of the University of Chicago, have noted that these children also require care and supervision after school. While private After-School Care programs are currently available, many covering both year 1 to year 3, as well as year 4 to year 6, most are too expensive for middle-income families.
In addition, the hours that After-School Care is available are very restricted. The limited hours of the current system inhibit the ability of caregiving parents, most often the mother, to hold a job with any middle or senior management responsibility because of the necessity to leave work early to retrieve children from After-School Care.
These shortcomings of After-School Care availability directly impact the ability of women to remain in the Japanese workforce and to rise to more senior positions, as many working parents of elementary school-age children, particularly mothers, are forced to make difficult choices or sometimes decline additional work responsibilities because they need to be available to care for their children. Thus, if the GOJ is serious about increasing the participation of women in the workforce and in middle and senior management positions, these issues must be addressed urgently.
Childcare in Sweden offers a successful example that Japan would do well to emulate. In Sweden, daycare is provided to all 6 to 12 year-olds. Daycare is guaranteed and government subsidized, and offered both before and after school. Sweden’s leisure-time centers, family daycare homes, and open leisure-time activities give parents the support and the flexibility to continue their work when school is not in session, whether in the morning, late afternoon or during school holidays.
Japan’s growing number of retirees may be of assistance in solving the After-School Care shortage. The aging population and the retirement regulations of many employers mean that there are a number of capable individuals over the age of 60 who are currently unemployed or underemployed. These individuals, who still wish to work and make a contribution to society, are an excellent resource to fill the need for increased after-school childcare at either public sector or private-sector After-School Care facilities. In addition to having a desire to work on a part-time basis, such individuals can share a wealth of knowledge and experience with the next generation. Because this work would be new and different for them, however, many would need training and possibly tax or other financial incentives.
One final way to increase the facilities for needed After-School Care and to make that care more broadly accessible would be to implement subsidies or tax incentives for private organizations that promote or provide that care. This could include offering subsidies or tax deductions to companies that pay the cost of private After-School Care on behalf of their employees and/or establishing personal tax incentives, such as a tax rebates or tax deductions for parents using private After-School Care or allowing After-School Care providers over the age of 60 to earn a specified amount of income tax-free or without impacting the national pension such individuals are eligible to receive.

CONCLUSION
­
It is important to consider the widest possible range of measures calculated to increase the capacity and usability of the current public and private After-School Care system, to offer working parents flexibility in choosing how to balance work and family considerations. It is worth noting that many women who are well qualified for middle and senior management positions are likely to have elementary school-age children and, if they cannot find suitable After-School Care for their children, they are less likely to be positioned to be selected for, and willing to accept, the senior management positions the GOJ aspires to see them occupy, or positions which will make them eligible to be selected for senior management positions in the future. For these reasons, the ACCJ respectfully urges the GOJ to take steps such as those recommended in this viewpoint.

女性の職業参画(特に管理職)を支援するために学童保育制度の拡充を要望

ウィメン・イン・ビジネス委員会

提言
ACCJは、職場への女性の参画を拡大させるという安倍政権の政策目標を歓迎する。日本の企業において指導的地位に占める女性の割合を2020年までに30%とする目標と幼児を持つ親が職場に留まれるように未就学児の保育施設である保育園を充実させることは、この政策目標を実現するための重要な一歩である。しかし、子供が小学校入学以降も学童保育は必要であるにもかかわらず、現時点では学童保育は十分に整備されていない。そのためACCJは、日本政府に以下を提言する。

公的な学童保育の対象を現在の1-3年生から4-6年生まで迅速に広げるために追加的措置を講ずることで、働く母親が指導的地位を家族のために断念することなく、引き受けることが可能となる。
学童保育の保育時間を少なくとも午後8時まで延長することで、中間管理職あるいは上級管理職にある親が就業後に子供を迎えに行けるよう柔軟性を持たせる。
パートタイム勤務を望む60才以上の個人に公的な学童保育指導員としての役割を担ってもらうことにより、学童保育指導員の数を増やす(例えば、2016年までに2倍、2020年までに3倍に)。
公的学童指導員数を増加させるために習得すべき情報などを網羅した無料のトレーニングコースを提供する。
学童保育を推進もしくは提供する民間の組織に助成金を提供するまたは民間の学童保育を利用する親と学童保育指導員に税金の優遇措置を与える。

問題点
家族の成長と共に女性がキャリアで進展するためには、未就学児保育と同様に小学校児童の世話が重要である。2012年8月の児童福祉法改正により、公立の学童保育の利用の対象が2015年4月から6年生(12才)まで拡充されることとなっているが、より迅速に包括的な収容能力の向上を図るための追加的措置を講じるよう日本政府に提案する。

現在の公立の学童保育の規模や内容が不十分であることは疑いの余地がない。2012年5月現在、学童保育数20,846か所に対して、利用児童は846,967人となっており、過去14年間で、施設数は2.2倍入所者数は2.5倍に増加した。現在の政府からの助成を受けている学童保育は、おもに1-3年生が利用しており、学童保育の50%は4年生以上を受け付けていない。全国学童保育連絡協議会の調査によると、3年から4年生の間で入所児童数が大きく減っており(表1)、潜在的な待機児童数は50万人以上と推測される。

全国学童保育連絡協議会やシカゴ大学山口一男教授他の多くの専門家が指摘しているように、4-6年生の放課後の保育・管理が必要にもかかわらず、4-6年生の親に対する公的な支援が皆無に近い状態である。一方で、放課後利用できる1-3年生ならびに4-6年生対象の民間の保育施設という選択肢もあるが、中間所得層の家庭には金銭的負担が大きくのしかかる。

加えて、現在の学童保育の開設時間は非常に限られている。現在の限定的な開設時間は、子供の世話を行う親、多くの場合母親は、学童保育に子供を迎えに行くために退社しなければならないため中間管理職または上級管理職として働くことを阻まれることがある。

小学校に通う年齢の子供を持つ多くの働く親、特に母親は子供の世話をするために、難しい選択を迫られたり、これまで以上の責務を辞退しなければならないことがあるため、学童保育の不足は職場に留まり、より高い地位を目指す女性に直接的な影響を与える。従って、日本政府が中間管理職や上級管理職の女性を増やすことを真剣に考えるならば、上記の課題を早急に解決する必要がある。

スウェーデンの保育制度は日本が参考にすべき成功例を示している。スウェーデンでは、保育対象年齢を6才から12才としている。保育所は国が保証し、国からの補助も受けており、登校前と放課後の両方利用できる。スウェーデンの課外活動センター、家族保育施設、参加自由形の余暇活動の存在は、親が仕事を続けられるように、早朝、夕方以降、休校日にかかわらず授業中以外の時間帯に親を支援し、柔軟性を与えている。

日本で増加し続ける定年退職者は、学童保育指導員の不足を補う助けとなり得る。高齢化する人口と多くの雇用主が採用している定年退職規定は、現在雇用されていない、もしくは潜在失業の60歳以上の有能な人材が多くいることを意味している。引続き働き社会に貢献することを望んでいるこれらの人々は、公立あるいは民間の施設での学童保育の拡充に対する需要に応え得る優秀な人材である。このような人材は、パートタイムで働く希望を持っていることに加えて、次の世代に豊かな知識と経験を伝えることができる。しかし、学童保育指導員という仕事は、彼等の多くにとって経験したことのない新しい仕事であるため、トレーニングや場合によっては税制、その他の財政的優遇措置が必要であろう。

学童保育に必要な施設を拡充し、学童保育をより利用しやすくする最後の方法は、これを推進・実施しようとしている民間の組織に対し助成金の交付または税金の優遇措置を導入することだろう。これには従業員にかわって私立の学童保育の費用を負担する法人に対する助成金の交付や減税措置であったり、私立の学童保育を利用する親個人への税金還付や減税のような優遇措置の導入、または60歳以上の学童保育指導員の収入のうち一定額を非課税にしたり、受給する年金の額に影響を与えないようにすることなどが含まれる。

結論
働く親に仕事と家庭のバランスを取る際の選択肢を提供するために、公的および民間の学童保育制度の収容能力と有用性を高めるための最大限幅広い施策を検討することが重要である。

中間管理職や上級管理職に適任な女性には学齢期の子供を持つ者も多く、もし放課後に子供を安心して預けられる適切な学童保育施設が見つからなければ、このような女性たちは、日本政府が熱望しているような上級管理職に選ばれたり、その役職を引き受けたりする可能性は低くなると考えられる。また、将来的に上級管理職に就く機会を得るために経験すべき役職を引き受けることも難しくなるだろう。従ってACCJは、日本政府に対し、本意見書で述べた提言をするものである。