The Journal The Authority on Global Business in Japan

ACCJ Chapter | Chubu

September 2013

GREETINGS FROM CHUBU
With nine committees, a busy events calendar, and a strong entrepreneurial spirit, this lively chapter has fun moving fast

By Steve Burson

Being the smallest chapter of the ACCJ is a real advantage to us here in the Chubu region. We move fast and we have a lot of fun! We have nine very active committees, for which the networking and information pillars of the ACCJ are the main focus. In particular, the entrepreneurial spirit in Chubu is unlike that in any other region. Our Independent Business Committee and our Business Programs Committee lead this very active audience with many breakfast and evening meetings on a variety of interesting topics.

However, we have also begun our own advocacy. In September, we will launch the Chubu Chapter’s first position paper, that highlights “How to Put Chubu on the Global Map.” The paper was written together with the Greater Nagoya Initiative, that represents the region’s national and local government, industry, and academia. Its goal is to help promote foreign direct investment, as well as alliances between overseas and Japanese companies. The paper explains how we are striving to create a more international city, one that can enhance business between Japan and the United States.

Our chapter is built on the back of support from the US Consulate, constituents of our Sustaining Corporate Membership (Oak Lawn Marketing and Nanzan University), and Nagoya’s industry (particularly automotive and aerospace companies, which are represented by committees in our chapter).

If you are coming through Nagoya anytime soon, look us up. We would love to see you!

As an example of the activity here in Chubu, I will leave you with reports on two exciting events just completed.

Chubu Women in Business Committee Event
On July 9, the Chubu Women in Business Committee hosted Professor Edward Yagi from Nagoya’s Nanzan University Graduate School of Business Administration.

Yagi spoke on the topic “Professional Women and Uncomfortable Men: Insights on 10,000 Companies from Someone Who Has Seen It All.” He discussed historical reasons for women having been, and still being, poorly represented in the global workforce.

The professional status of women in Japan is still remarkably low compared with that of those in the majority of developed nations, he explained. Concerning equality and diversity, he argued for mutuality, and how this concept could bring women to the fore, in Japan and around the world.
More details: www.accj.or.jp/images/PDF/edward_yagi_eng.pdf

Mobility Manufacturing Committee: Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant Tour
The ACCJ (Chubu) Mobility Manufacturing Committee hosted a tour of the Chubu Electric Power Company (CEPCO) Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station on July 11. The 18 participants joined us from the Chubu region and Tokyo.

The tour was organized to inspect the recently implemented earthquake and tsunami countermeasures to which CEPCO has devoted considerable resources. If a picture is worth a thousand words, seeing something firsthand is most impressive. Two briefings were held, one on the bus and the other at the facility, the latter by CEPCO executives in charge of the Hamaoka facility.

With ACCJ tour members given ample opportunity to address their questions and concerns to the executives, the tour was both interesting and informative. One highlight was being able to see up close and touch the formidable anti-tsunami wall that has been constructed.

The ACCJ and the Mobility Manufacturing Committee would like to thank CEPCO for their kind hospitality. In addition, we would like to single out Mr. Yoshiro Hiraiwa for his efforts to help put the event together and for acting as guide and presenter on the bus provided by his company. •

Steve Burson - ACCJ Journal

Steve Burson is Vice President of the ACCJ Chubu Chapter.

[A] tour was organized to inspect the recently implemented earthquake and tsunami countermeasures to which CEPCO has devoted considerable resources. If a picture is worth a thousand words, seeing something firsthand is most impressive.”